Dallas Federal Reserve Bank President Robert Kaplan expects the U.S. economy to grow at 2.2%-2.5% in 2019-2020.

Becky Berkman

2019-06-11 12:33:00 Tue ET

Dallas Federal Reserve Bank President Robert Kaplan expects the U.S. economy to grow at 2.2%-2.5% in 2019-2020 as inflation rises a bit. In an interview with Fox Business Network, Kaplan indicates that it might be too soon to gauge the ripple effects of U.S. tariffs on core Chinese and European imports, dollar gyrations, and inflationary concerns.

As the Federal Reserve remains patient on the next monetary policy adjustments, credible central bank communication can help circumvent financial imbalances in the U.S. real economy. Meanwhile, the Sino-American trade tension intensifies, so many stock market analysts now consider low inflation to be transitory. As Federal Reserve balance sheet shrinkage continues, some stock market analysts expect this balance sheet strategy to halt in light of higher U.S. Treasury bond yields. The higher yields may inadvertently tighten credit conditions for mortgage borrowers and corporate debtors. In this negative light, this logic leads to financial imbalances in the form of exorbitant mortgage and business debt. These financial imbalances can exacerbate the real estate and business debt dilemma. When push comes to shove, monetary policymakers need to consider the potential ramifications of credit supply shortage before Federal Reserve steers the next interest rate adjustments.

 


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