President Trump floats generous 10% tax cuts for the U.S. middle class ahead of the November 2018 mid-term elections.

Jacob Miramar

2018-10-21 14:40:00 Sun ET

President Trump floats generous 10% tax cuts for the U.S. middle class ahead of the November 2018 mid-term elections. Republican senators, congressmen, and congresswomen can propose massive tax cuts for middle-income Americans. This time may be a bit different, and President Trump expects the tax bill to go through Congress but not an executive order. The Trump administration suggests that the legislative vote will likely take place soon after the mid-term elections. The strategic move boosts confidence in the Republican lawmakers who can continue to control Congress. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin cannot offer details on the middle-income tax brackets that can experience lower effective tax rates. This tax bill may add to the prior $1.5 trillion tax cuts and $779 billion fiscal deficits.

Republican leaders and senators emphasize that this tax bill will finance itself with better real GDP economic growth in the healthy upper range of 3%-4%. The Trump administration can offset these new tax cuts with lower government expenditures in Medicare, Medicaid, and social security. Alternatively, the Trump administration can raise effective tax rates for most rich Americans in the top 1% socioeconomic echelon to partially offset the new tax cuts for the U.S. middle-class.

 


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