Google CEO Sundar Pichai makes his debut testimony before Congress.
John Fourier

2018-12-15 14:38:00 Sat ET

Google CEO Sundar Pichai makes his debut testimony before Congress. The post-mid-term-election House Judiciary Committee bombards Pichai with key questions on whether the Internet search company harbors political bias. Lawmakers further ask him about some recent Google plans to re-enter the Chinese market with its Project Dragonfly and user privacy initiatives. Pichai pushes back against several allegations and accusation of partisan bias. He emphasizes the fact that Google provides Internet platforms for both diverse and open perspectives and opinions while there is no shortage of them among Google executives and other employees.

Pichai leads the Internet search platform enterprise without political bias and thus works hard to ensure that all Google software products continue to operate that way. He also emphasizes the core conviction that any form of political bias would be inconsistent with the main principles and business interests of Alphabet, Google, and their affiliates.

The congressional testimony sheds new light on the Google PageRank black-box algorithm, which takes into account online content curation, backlink creation, and numerous other traffic-driven metrics for efficiently ranking webpages worldwide. However, this testimony leaves open the more urgent questions about the recent Google security breaches, bulk data collection practices, anti-competitive gambits, and potential antitrust regulations.

 


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