Many U.S. large public corporations spend their tax cuts on new dividend payout and share buyback.
Jacob Miramar

2018-05-23 09:41:00 Wed ET

Many U.S. large public corporations spend their tax cuts on new dividend payout and share buyback but not on new job creation and R&D innovation. These public corporations channel $1 trillion onshore and offshore cash stockpiles into dividend and share buyback programs. For instance, Apple expects to spend $100 billion cash on share repurchases from mid-2018 to early-2020. Cisco spends $25 billion on share buyback, and Wells Fargo plans $22 billion share purchases. Google also expects to spend about $9 billion on dividend payout and share buyback in order to boost its near-term stock price prospects. Pepsi, AbbVie, and Amgen collectively spend $35 billion on share repurchases for better shareholder value maximization. Visa and eBay plan to initiate similar dividend and share buyback programs over the next couple of years.

Overall, these public corporations seem to view Trump tax cuts are temporary cash windfalls but not permanent cash gains. These companies initiate cash dividends and share repurchases for immediate shareholder gratification. It is thus less clear whether Trump tax cuts serve as permanent income boosts that can help revive real economic output, employment, capital investment, or R&D innovation etc.

 


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