Many U.S. large public corporations spend their tax cuts on new dividend payout and share buyback.
Jacob Miramar

2018-05-23 09:41:00 Wed ET

Many U.S. large public corporations spend their tax cuts on new dividend payout and share buyback but not on new job creation and R&D innovation. These public corporations channel $1 trillion onshore and offshore cash stockpiles into dividend and share buyback programs. For instance, Apple expects to spend $100 billion cash on share repurchases from mid-2018 to early-2020. Cisco spends $25 billion on share buyback, and Wells Fargo plans $22 billion share purchases. Google also expects to spend about $9 billion on dividend payout and share buyback in order to boost its near-term stock price prospects. Pepsi, AbbVie, and Amgen collectively spend $35 billion on share repurchases for better shareholder value maximization. Visa and eBay plan to initiate similar dividend and share buyback programs over the next couple of years.

Overall, these public corporations seem to view Trump tax cuts are temporary cash windfalls but not permanent cash gains. These companies initiate cash dividends and share repurchases for immediate shareholder gratification. It is thus less clear whether Trump tax cuts serve as permanent income boosts that can help revive real economic output, employment, capital investment, or R&D innovation etc.

 


If any of our AYA Analytica financial health memos (FHM), blog posts, ebooks, newsletters, and notifications etc, or any other form of online content curation, involves potential copyright concerns, please feel free to contact us at service@ayafintech.network so that we can remove relevant content in response to any such request within a reasonable time frame.

Blog+More
CBS and its special committee of independent directors have decided to sue the Redstone controlling shareholders.
Daisy Harvey

2018-05-09 08:31:00 Wednesday ET

CBS and its special committee of independent directors have decided to sue the Redstone controlling shareholders.

CBS and its special committee of independent directors have decided to sue the Redstone controlling shareholders because these directors might have breached

+See More
Higher public debt levels, interest rate hikes, and subpar Chinese economic growth rates are the major risks to the world economy.
Daphne Basel

2019-01-23 11:32:00 Wednesday ET

Higher public debt levels, interest rate hikes, and subpar Chinese economic growth rates are the major risks to the world economy.

Higher public debt levels, global interest rate hikes, and subpar Chinese economic growth rates are the major risks to the world economy from 2019 to 2020.

+See More
Fed Chair Janet Yellen confirms with her successor Jerome Powell the final interest rate hike in December 2017.
Joseph Corr

2017-12-14 12:41:00 Thursday ET

Fed Chair Janet Yellen confirms with her successor Jerome Powell the final interest rate hike in December 2017.

Federal Reserve raises the interest rate by 25 basis points to the target range of 1.25% to 1.5% as FOMC members revise up their GDP estimate from 2% to 2.5

+See More
Carl Icahn mulls over steps to shake up the board of SandRidge Energy after it adopts a counter poison pill.
Jacob Miramar

2017-11-29 07:42:00 Wednesday ET

Carl Icahn mulls over steps to shake up the board of SandRidge Energy after it adopts a counter poison pill.

The octogenarian billionaire and activist investor Carl Icahn mulls over steps to shake up the board of SandRidge Energy after the oil-and-gas company adopt

+See More
Top 4 U.S. richest people are self-made billionaires: Gates, Buffet, Bloomberg, and Zuckerberg.
Dan Rochefort

2017-08-01 09:40:00 Tuesday ET

Top 4 U.S. richest people are self-made billionaires: Gates, Buffet, Bloomberg, and Zuckerberg.

In American states, all of the Top 4 richest people are self-made billionaires: Bill Gates in Washington, Warren Buffett in Nebraska, Michael Bloomberg in N

+See More
New York Fed CEO John Williams sees no need to raise the interest rate unless economic growth or inflation rises to a high gear.
Joseph Corr

2019-02-28 12:39:00 Thursday ET

New York Fed CEO John Williams sees no need to raise the interest rate unless economic growth or inflation rises to a high gear.

New York Fed CEO John Williams sees no need to raise the interest rate unless economic growth or inflation rises to a high gear. After raising the interest

+See More