JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon views wealth inequality as a major economic problem in America.
Monica McNeil

2019-12-19 14:43:00 Thu ET

JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon views wealth inequality as a major economic problem in America. Dimon now warns that the rich Americans have been getting wealthier too much in many ways. In contrast, Dimon further observes that middle-class income remains flat for 15-20 years. This stark economic divergence cannot be particularly good in America.

Some demographic changes may be the root cause of both wealth inequality and a rare lack of trade-off between inflation and unemployment in America. The latter has profound public policy implications for the Federal Reserve and Treasury in terms of dovish interest rate adjustments with better fiscal prudence. The Sargent-Wallace monetarist arithmetic analysis shows that the monetary authority cannot contain inflation with maximum sustainable employment and price stability when the government continues to issue public bonds to fund incessant fiscal deficits on top of national debt mountains. The Dimon remarks emerge amid many criticisms of the top U.S. income cohort by Democratic Senator Elizabeth Warren, Former Vice President Joe Biden, and Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg. Dimon further suggests that both income and wealth inequality may inadvertently widen disparities in socioeconomic opportunities from education and health care to employment and technology.

 


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